Navjote

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Navjote with Party Specialists

Zoroastrianism is one the oldest religions in the world and was founded by the prophet, Zoroaster. Zoroastrians believe in one God, Ahura Mazda. Zoroastrians are directed to follow a path of truth and righteousness, called “Asha.”

There are very few Zoroastrians in the world today but it still holds an important place. A large part of their population is divided between Iran and India.

Fire is an important symbol in the faith. Fire or light represents the divine light of the Ahura Mazda. Therefore, when a Zoroastrian prays, he prays in the direction of fire or light. Zoroastrians still keep many wonderful rituals, and the basis of the religion is to live by the ethics of ‘Good Words, Good Thoughts and Good Deeds.

The Navjote ceremony initiates a person into the Zoroastrian faith and is one of the most important rites of passage in their lives and in the lives of their families. Navjote means new (nav) life (jote), or ‘one who offers prayers.’ To represent ‘good thoughts, words and deeds,’ a Zoroastrian will wear a sacred shirt, called a ‘Sudreh’ and around him a special string, called a ‘Kusti.’

In the months or years before the day of the navjote, the initiate will have learnt a set of prayers called the Kusti Prayers from his or her parents or family. These are the daily prayers that a Zoroastrian recites when untying and retying the cord called the kusti, around her or his waist.

The Sudreh and Kusti are articles of faith, worn as undergarments from the navjote ceremony onwards.

During the Navjote ceremony, the initiate and officiating priest rise to stand facing one-another marking the start of the navjote. Once standing together they begin to recite the kusti prayers, the prayers for untying and retying the kusti.

The ceremony ends with the initiate and priest opposite one another, and the priest offering blessings – praying that the initiate may enjoy a long, healthy and righteous life full of virtue and grace.

Following the ceremony, the child is viewed as a member of the Zoroastrian
community, bearing its rewards and responsibilities.

The winged symbol of the Farohar as shown below represents the presence of Ahura Mazda in every human being. It is one of the best know symbols of Zoroastrianism and represents the guardian angel of man

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The reception begins with the introduction of the honored guest and dinner, then it’s time to dance and have fun with Party Specialists, Inc. We can create a timeline or are open to your ideas for you to set a program for your special event. We play a mix of current music and Bollywood favorites to get everyone up to celebrate this special event.